The Facts About Road Accident Claims and Children

Practical advice to keep children safe


Jeffries Solicitors
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The Department of Transport statistics show that between 2011 and 2012, the amount of children killed or seriously injured on the UK’s roads fell by 1 per cent and the number of child casualties also fell by 10 per cent during this time. But despite these figures, 10 per cent of the people killed or seriously injured during this period were still all children. However, a different, more recent report has revealed that deaths and serious injuries of children under five are at the highest level in ten years. So what can be done to help to protect our children?

·          Road safety in schools: Although many schools do teach their pupils about road safety through the Highway Code, it is not actually part of the national curriculum, so there is no guarantee that your child will get any such education about road safety through their school. There is currently a petition appealing for road safety lessons to become a compulsory part of the Key Stage 1 curriculum.

·          Teaching your child road safety: You should begin teaching your child the rules of the road as early as possible so that they’ll grow up with it as a normal and regular part of their lives. When you and your child are out, talk them through the reasons why you do what you do, e.g. why you are waiting to cross? This can be more effective than just telling them that they have to wait, as this way, they then learn why.

·          Improving your child’s safety: If your child has a bike, make sure they have a light and bell attached so other road users will always be aware that they are there. ( Many children’s coats now have reflective strips, improving their visibility to drivers when it is dark.) Always ensure a child’s car seat is safely secured before travelling and check that they have also put on their seatbelts. Again, explain to children the importance of wearing a seatbelt.

·          What if my child is injured on the roads: Child road accidents can take many forms –the victim could be a pedestrian, passenger or riding their own bike. It is important that you seek medical advice immediately should an accident happen, no matter how minor the injuries may seem.

·          How do I make a claim? As a parent, you must make a claim through a lawyer such as Jeffries Solicitors on your child’s behalf if they are involved in an accident on the roads. The doctor who saw your child will be able to confirm any injuries that your child may have suffered as a result of the accident.

As road accidents in under-fives are at their highest in 10 years, it is important that schools, the government, road safety charities and also parents come together and take action. You can visit the THINK! website for road safety advice, too.

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July 11, 2013

January 10, 2014